PRINT ISSN 1222-5304, ISSN-L: 2065-1295, ISSN CD: 2343-9394,ISSN ONLINE 2067-3663
 

THE INCIDENCE OF PANOSTEITIS IN DOGS ADMITTED IN SURGERY CLINIC OF THE FACULTY OF VETERINARY MEDICINE TIMISOARA - RETROSPECTIVE STUDY (2000-2015)

Published in Scientific Works. Series C. Veterinary Medicine, Vol. LXII, Issue 1
Written by Cornel IGNA, Roxana DASCĂLU, Daniel BUMB, Bogdan SICOE, Larisa SCHÜSZLER

The complete medical records of nine thousand five hundred and forty-one dogs who were admitted in the Surgery Clinic of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Timisoara, between years 2000 and 2015 were reviewed. In this study we included one hundred fifty-four dogs which have been diagnosed with panosteitis. We reported the signalment, bodyweight, breed, gender, clinical features and treatments. The extracted data were statistically processed and compared with another studies Panosteitis is an idiopathic disease of the young dogs, which usually affects large breeds. Long bones are preferentially affected. Clinical signs are lameness, decreased appetite and activity, rarely muscular atrophy, painful diaphysis at palpation. The radiographic modifications are essentially, an increased density of the medullary cavity, loss of normal trabecular pattern, periosteal reaction. In medical records of the Surgery Clinic of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Timisoara canine panosteitis is a common orthopedic condition in the growing dogs and it affects large breeds. The German shepherd and mixed breed are most commonly affected with panosteitis. The predilection for males to have panosteitis is reliable and important. An acute onset of mild to moderate lameness is the typical history that was registered. The treatment was based on rest associated with anti-inflammatory drugs administration.

[Read full article] [Citation]

The publisher is not responsible for the opinions published in the Volume. They represent the authors’ point of view.

© 2019 Scientific Papers. C Series. Veterinary Medicine. All Rights Reserved. To be cited: Scientific Papers. C Series. Veterinary Medicine.

Powered by INTELIDEV