ASSESSING THE PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA INFECTION AND THE ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS IN OWNED DOGS AND CATS, IN BUCHAREST’S URBAN AREA

Published in Scientific Works. Series C. Veterinary Medicine, Vol. LXIII, Issue 1
Written by Marie-Monique SORAN, Mariana IONIȚĂ, Ioan Liviu MITREA

Giardia is a ubiquitous organism that affects humans and animals, with potential to contaminate the water and food, raising a concern in public health interest due to its zoonotic risk. In order to estimate the parasitic pressure for the both animal and human health, it was evaluated the prevalence of Giardia infection in pets (owned dogs and cats) originated from the urban area of Bucharest. Therefore, within 4 months (May-August, 2016), a total number of 188 faecal samples from dogs and 79 fecal samples from cats were investigated. Animals were of different breeds or mixed and different ages (from 1 month up to 16 years for cats, and up to 18 years, for dogs, respectively). Faecal samples were processed by zinc sulphate 33% solution flotation, Lügol stained and microscopically examined for identification of Giardia cysts. Additionally, other parasitic stages (oocysts, eggs) were also registered. Overall, out of the total faecal samples of dogs and cats, 41.49% (95%CI: 34.36-48.89), and 34.18% (95% CI: 23.87-45.71), respectively, were positive for parasite infections. Giardia cysts were recorded in quite similar prevalence in dogs, of 21.28% (40/188) and cats, of 22.78% (18/79). A higher prevalence of Giardia infection was found in puppies (23.89%) and older dogs (30.00%), and kittens (26.42%), respectively, compared to the adults (15.38% in dogs and 14.29% in cats). Additional, other parasite infections were found, as follows: in dogs, Isospora spp. (12.23%), Ancylostoma caninum (5.85%), Toxocara canis (4.26%), Uncinaria stenocephala (0.53%), Toxascaris leonina (0.53%) and Dipylidium caninum (0.53%); while in cats, Toxocara cati (10.13%) and Isospora spp. (8.86%) infections were registered. The findings of the present study are of relevance for the both animal and public health, emphasizing potential high risks for parasite infection, including parasites with zoonotic potential.

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SORAN M.M., IONIȚĂ M., MITREA I.L. 2017, ASSESSING THE PREVALENCE OF GIARDIA INFECTION AND THE ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS IN OWNED DOGS AND CATS, IN BUCHAREST’S URBAN AREA. Scientific Works. Series C. Veterinary Medicine, Vol. LXIII, Issue 1, ISSN 2065-1295, 128-135.


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